My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor

My Beloved World

There is no experience that can’t avail something useful, be it only the discipline to manage adversity.
Sonia Sotomayor

How does a girl growing up in a Bronx housing project straddling two cultures become an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court?   The girl is Sonia Sotomayor, with an affectionate extended family lately come from Puerto Rico, who is determined to wring the most from her education and learn from those with whom she is associated. Frequent trips back to Puerto Rico keep that island country, its inhabitants, and its future firmly anchored in her mind.  Early on Sonia admires the law as a vehicle for improving conditions for many.   Initially, as part of an affirmative action program, Sonia is admitted into Princeton and feels out of her depth; but mega amounts of work and participation in various projects bring about recognition of her skills and achievements and she graduates with highest honors.  Sonia enters Yale Law School where she is challenged yet invigorated with knowing that she has chosen the right field.  Sonia lays out her experiences prosecuting felonies as an assistant district attorney in New York County.  In order to gain knowledge of commercial law, Sonia joins a law firm and later is offered a partnership  with a proviso—that she agree to remain with the firm until she is appointed a judge—for her long-held ambition and strong work ethic to serve justice clearly point her in that direction. Sonia Sotomayor first serves as district court judge in New York and subsequently as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.  President Barack Obama nominated Sonia Sotomayor as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in May, 2009, and she assumed this role on August 8, 2009.

This is the most worthwhile autobiography of a contemporary person that this reviewer has ever read.

 

Written by Reference Librarian Ellie.

 

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