WFPL Blog

Take a chance on new authors!

We all get in reading ruts sometimes, even librarians. We stick with authors we know, ones we are comfortable with, ones we feel won’t let us down.

An Exciting New Way to Take Classes!

Have you ever wished you could learn something new, but don’t have the time or money to take a class?   Would you like to learn tools to advance your career?   Master a new craf

Updates on the eReading World!

From the many new eReader model announcements to Overdrive enhancements, there’s a lot to be excited about in the eReading world these days.

The Website You Can’t Live Without

If you have ever wondered where a title is in a series, or if an author has written other books, I have a website for you: Fantastic Fiction (

Want to listen to an arresting audio book?

Then listen to The Heretic's Daughter by Kathleen Kent., a compelling historical novel that is primarily set in the Andover-Billerica area of Massachusetts in the 1690s.  The narrator

Exciting and Interesting Science Books!

Our library is extremely fortunate to be well funded. What this means for the librarians that are responsible for collection development is that we are able to buy lots of amazing books.

One Book, One Watertown Events Begin!

After months of anticipation, the Watertown Free Public Library is thrilled to be kicking off our 2 jam-packed months of events celebrating Harper Lee’s classic American novel, To Kill a Mockin

Discover/Rediscover Some Great Music!

Since I’m a librarian, you probably think that I enjoy finding new books & authors to read.  You wouldn’t be wrong, but I mostly love discovering new music!  Here are some of my curre

Chef Memoirs, Biographies, and More!

I am obsessed with cooking shows: Chopped, Master Chef and Iron Chef America are some of my current favorites, but now that I think about it, I used to watch the Frugal Gourmet and some Julia Child

The Browne House and Early Watertown

Ever wonder what life was like and what issues faced the residents of early Watertown in the mid to late 1600s in the relatively young colony of Massachusetts?

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